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Windows Guide

The "Ask Anna" guides are designed to assist you as you make important decisions in decorating your home. It is our sincerest hope that these guides, combined with the expertise of our sales associates, will serve as your complete resource in selecting your home fashions!

As you beautify your home with style, the answers you need are never far from reach… Just Ask Anna!

 

Buying GuidesBuyers Guide


  • Bedding Guide
  • Sheets Guide
  • Bath Guide
  • Windows Guide
  • Tablecloth Guide
  •  
    Love Your Windows!
    Panel Selections
    Curtain and Quantity
    How Many Curtain Panels Do I Need?
    Top Treatments
    Valance Styles
    How Many Valances Do I Need?
    Tiers

    Hardware
    Decorative Hardware
    What is Basic Hardware Used For?

    Installation
    Terms to Know
    Measuring Guide
    Measuring for Draperies
    How to Measure Hardware
    Determine the Width for Center-Draw Draperies
    Rod-pocket Draperies & Curtains


    Hardware Defined
    Double Rod
    Traverse Rod
    Ceiling Mount Rod
    Downloadable Forms & Guide
    Download Guide
    Measurement Check List

    Love your Windows!

    Curtain panels offer any room a touch of personality. They decorate your windows by adding color, they reflect personal style, deflect light and lend privacy. Some styles offer room darkening or energy saving properties. We want to make sure you love your windows. Read this brochure to learn more.


    Panel Selections

    Black Out: They are lined, interlined or coated and are made of dense, heavy-weight fabric. Black out panels block 99% of exterior light, are energy efficient and reduce exterior noise.
    Foam Back/Lined/Interlined are additional layers of material that offer energy savings, insulation and privacy.
    Grommet hang through metal or plastic rings on a decorative rod for a contemporary look.
    Rod (Pole) Pocket have "sleeves" and fit rods between 2" and 3.5" in diameter.
    Sheers are made out of translucent or see-through fabric.
    Tab Top hang from fabric "tabs" that loop around a decorative rod.
    Tiers cover the bottom half of windows and are mostly used in kitchens and bathrooms with matching swags and valances.


    Curtain and Quantity

    Our panels are sold primarily in 63" and 84" lengths, which will fit the majority of windows. Refer to the Panel Size Chart below for more information.


    Panel Size How it Hangs
    63" Panel Typically hangs to the bottom of a window
    84" Panel Typically hangs to the floor on a standard height window
    95" Panel Typically hangs to the floor from a higher window

    How Many Curtain Panels Do I Need?

    Panels are sold individually, not in pairs. This is because the number of panels needed is determined by the width of the window you are covering.
    Generally, a window with several panels will look fuller and more luxurious. Reference the Window Size Chart below to help determine the amount of panels needed, or ask our friendly Sales Associates for assistance.


    If You Are Using
    Inches
    If You Are Using
    Centimeters
    Number of Panels
    Needed
    Up to 36" Up to 91.44 2
    37" to 61" 93.98 to 154.94 2 to 3
    62" to 81" 157.48 to 205.74 3 to 4
    82" to 111" 208.28 to 281.94 4 to 5
    112" to 136" 284.48 to 345.44 5 to 6
    137" to 161" 347.98 to 408.94 6 to 7
    162" to 186" 411.48 to 472.44 7 to 8
    187" to 228" 474.98 to 579.12 8 to 9

    Top Treatments

    Valances are used to decorate the top of a window. Changing or adding a valance creates a new look for windows and enhances a room's theme.


    Valance Styles

    Ascot are "V-shaped" and are usually trimmed with tassels or beads.
    Balloon Valance are made of light-weight fabric gathered so much that it "puffs out" like a balloon.
    Federal Valances are sophisticated valances that has several "tucks" in the fabric that creates a swag effect within the valance; usually trimmed with beads or tassels.
    Scarves are long pieces of fabric designed to drape over the top of a window. They can hang over a decorative rod or can be held in place by sconces or drapery hold backs through which the fabric may be looped, tied or fanned out into a "poof". For a great look, combine colors or to add your own decorative touch, by using multiple scarves. The ends can be braided, adorned with tassels, flowers, etc.
    Swags descend in a zigzag form and are popular in kitchen curtains. They are sold in sets.
    Tailored Valances are simple, straight valance with clean lines.
    Waterfall Valances create a flowing drape of fabric over windows. They can be hung in a variety of ways.


    How Many Valances Do I Need?

    For the full, luxurious effect, double or triple the width of your window. For example, if your window is 42" wide, you will need a minimum of 84" to 126" of total valance width.


    Tiers

    Tiers are short panels mostly purchased for a kitchen or bathroom. We sell tier pairs in 24", 30" and 36" lengths. A swag set and valance complete the window as pictured below. For best results, we recommend you purchase enough tiers to double the width of your window. A Cafe Rod or basic white hardware rod can be used to hang the tiers.



    Buyers Guide
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    Hardware

    Decorative Hardware

    Decorative Hardware adds a personal touch and is intended to enhance the look of any window. Below are various types of Decorative Hardware.
    Clip Rings are small metal, wood or plastic rings with a clip, that are used to hang panels or draperies. The rings slide onto a curtain rod and the clips attach to the panels.
    Decorative Rods allow you to accent the room's theme. They are usually made of metal so they hold more weight than standard white hardware.
    Finials are decorative shaped elements at the end of a decorative rod.
    Sconces are used to loop scarves through. They can be mounted at the top corners of the window or over a bed.
    Tiebacks/Holdbacks are made of fabric tassels or decorative metal. They are used to pull and hold curtains away from the window.
    Window Jewelry are decorative strands of beaded or jeweled ribbon that hang from a rod in front of a sheer or panel.

    What is Basic Hardware Used For?

    Basic Hardware is intended to be hidden from view. Below are various types of Basic Hardware:
    Continental Rods are extra wide rods that are used to hang panels and valances with 3" wide pockets.
    Double Curtain Rods are used to hang pairs of panels and valances.
    Single Curtain Rods are used to hang rod pocket panels and valances.
    Tension Rods are adjustable rods with springs that are used to hang panels and valances inside the window's frame, therefore, hardware is not needed.
    Traverse Rods are used to hang drapes pinned through plastic carriers on a metal rod. A wand is used to draw drapes open and closed.

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    Installation

    You’ve found window treatments you cannot live without. Now you just have to figure out how to hang them. We can help! On the next few pages are instructions on how to measure for all types of window coverings - there’s even space for notes. Let’s get started!


    Measuring Guide

    1. Use a metal measuring tape. Flexible cloth tapes are not as accurate
    2. What is the width? What is the length?
    3. Measure each window separately. They could vary enough to require different size treatments.

    Measuring for Draperies

    The rod should be positioned at least 4” above the window so pleats are not seen from the outside. Measure for length from where the top of the rod will be positioned to the desired length. Most common lengths is 63” below the window trim(or apron) or 84” to the floor.

    How to Measure Hardware

    1. Measure the window width from the outside edges. Add 4” per side to allow for bracket placement (of your window measures 50" wide, you would order a rod that extends up to at least 58").
    2. Finals add length to each end, depending upon style. Make sure you have enough room to accommodate them. (Finials are not included in rod measurements.)
    3. For an existing basic rod: Measure the width across the front gave of the rod from tip to tip. Do not include the “return.”
    4. For an existing decorative rod: Measure the width tip to tip of the rod, excluding the finials.

    Determine the width for center-draw draperies

    Follow these steps and use the diagram as a guide.
    1. Measure the window width [A], including casing, if any. Write down measurement.
    2. Measure from wall to the front face of the rod (the return*). Write down that measurement TWICE (one for each side.) If you don’t already have a traverse rod, assume it will have a return of about 4”, and write down 4” twice (8” Total).
    3. You’ll want draperies to overlap in the front when closed for privacy, so write down 4” to allow overlap.
    4. For privacy and light control, allow for stackback*. To determine this, take 15% of your window width (multiply window width [A] by 0.15). Write down measurement.
    5. Add together all the numbers you wrote down. In column “Total Measurement,” shown in the chart bellow, find the range your measurement falls under. Order the corresponding drapery width in the next column.

    Rod-pocket draperies and curtains

    Ordering 2-3 times the window width for desired fullness after shirring. Follow these steps and use the diagram at top left as guide.

    Determine width: Measure window width [A] including casing, if any. Rod-pocket items are not hung flat - they are gathered and shirred, so you’ll need extra fabric to cover your window. Multiply measurement [A] by 2 or 3. Buy the appropriate amount of panels.

    Determine Length: Measure how far down you want your window covering to go:
    1. Measure from top of the rod to the bottom of the sill.
    2. Measure from the top if the rod to the floor [D]. Subtract 1/2” and order the closest length.

    Terms to Know

    1. Clearance: The measurement from the wall to the back of the rod.
    2. Return: The measurement from the wall to the face of the rod.
    3. Stackback: The amount of space needed on either side of the window if pinch-pleated draperies are to clear the glass when they are completely opened. Buyers Guide

    Buyers Guide
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    Hardware Defined
    Buyers Guide

    Double Rod

    Even if your windows are fairly standard, you can make a huge visual impact by layering your window coverings. This technique calls for a double rod. Whether it’s ornate finials or sleek end caps, choose from variety of styles, finishes and sizes. Double rod set includes rods, finals, brackets and mounting hardware.

    Buyers Guide

    Traverse Rod

    If you open and close your draperies a lot, then your’ll want a traverse rod. Pinch-plete and rod-pocket draperies slide smoothly without the use of wands. You can even choose from center, right-, or left-handed draw. Whether you go for a single or double traverse rod, each set includes rod(s), finials, brackets, roller clips and mounting hardware.

    Buyers Guide

    Ceiling Mount Rod

    You don’t even need a window to use this rod. Since it hangs from the ceiling, it works anywhere in your house. Use it to create a room divider in a large, open space or a faux door between two rooms. And if you’re a hopeless romantic, this rod can make the most amazing anomy over your bed. So many great ideas.

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    Downloadable Forms & Guide

    Enjoyed this Guide?

    Click here to Download our PDF Window Guide


    Measurement Check List

    A printable checklist form for making your window experience simple and easy!
    Click here to Download the PDF Checklist Form

    Buyers Guide
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